Lead attorney for Antigua demands US to stop online casino „economic warfare“

Mark Mendel, lead attorney for Antigua, believes that, given the expansion of remote gambling in the US, with almost certainly more to come, that new claims before the World Trade Organization would result in larger settlements.

Mendel is attempting to reach a long-overdue settlement with the US regarding damages to the Antiguan economy caused by the US block of online casinos.

Mendel says that Antigua is still negotiating and will continue to do so until it feels it has exhausted all options. He suggests that a compromise which opens some online gambling markets in the US, while not granting full access, may be a possible solution.

He also believes that, given the expansion of remote gambling in the US, with almost certainly more to come, that new claims before the World Trade Organization would result in larger settlements. „It has only gotten clearer that the United States does not prohibit remote gambling, per se, and that it has erected trade barriers against other countries to protect its domestic markets. The UIGEA would never pass a review at the WTO.“

He also expresses the belief that US online gambling will be available in the immediate future from domestic operators, expanding upon what already exists. His hope is to get at least limited access to that market for Antiguan casino operators, and by consequence other legitimate international online gambling operators.

Mendel notes that even Antiguan banks have a strong WTO case against the US, and refers to the „terrible economic warfare“ inflicted on the island nation by the bully to the north. He notes that the WTO decisions have been heavily influenced by politics, and that, while law and precedent clearly favored the tiny island, the massive influence and power of the US has prevented full accounting for the damages done.

Like all those supporting rule by law, as well as those concerned with the online casino industry, Mendel hopes a new administration will begin to adjust US policies to reflect fairness and to respect international trade agreements.